Twitter Takeover : Monday : Suncat Project Officer, Natasha Aburrow-Jones

Natasha Aburrow-Jones, Project Officer, Suncat

Natasha Aburrow-Jones, Project Officer, Suncat

To celebrate National Libraries Day 2013 we launched the @VoicesLibrary Twitter Takeover. A new library worker each day will take control of our Twitter account. Monday’s tweeter is @TashaAJ 

My name is Natasha Aburrow-Jones, and I work on SUNCAT, the Serials Union Catalogue for the UK (This is provided by EDINA, a national data centre based at the University of Edinburgh, and is funded by JISC). SUNCAT contains (at present) the bibliographic records for the serials of 89 research libraries in the UK and their holdings. We have libraries ranging from the national (e.g., the British Library) to the University (e.g., the Oxford University libraries) to the specialist (e.g., the Wiener Library for the Study of the Holocaust and Genocide).

I am the Bibliographic Project Officer, which means that I keep an eye on our incoming data, oversee its conversion into a format suitable for loading into SUNCAT, and then load it. The bibliographic team is made up of three others who do the data conversions before loading. However, if there are any queries with the cataloguing of the data and subsequent conversion, I’m the go-to person (ten years cataloguing in various Oxford University libraries before I moved to SUNCAT has given me a comprehensive knowledge of cataloguing rules). I also am keeping track of RDA, which will have an impact on SUNCAT, both from an ingest and a display point of view.

I wanted to tweet for @VoicesLibrary as I thought it would be a good opportunity to shout about a fantastic (free) service, and to share the wonderful titles that our contributing libraries have! SUNCAT shows that libraries can work together, share information, and create something that is bigger than the individual parts. Equally, we know the value of the individual libraries can never be over-estimated. I wanted to show that not all librarians (if any!) fit into the stereo-type mould. I’m not your typical librarian any more, but I still call myself a librarian; I don’t see myself as a shambrarian, as my skills are more bibliographic than technical.

Follow @VoicesLibrary

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *