Tag Archives: social value

What is a library?

VftL are delighted to present a guest post by C. Horne.

What is a library?  Do you see a municipal red brick building, slightly tatty, maybe a bit unloved, possibly could do with a bit of attention?  When you walk in is the inside rimmed round with shelves all of which are crammed full of battered plastic covered books?  A few computers on some slightly dingy desks in the reference area, looking slightly out of place.  Behind the counter, a member of staff is dealing with a query about an overdue book.

All this is superficial – you aren’t seeing the real library.  Look deeper.

Over in the children’s library are some pushchairs crammed against the wall, their occupants balancing on their parents’ laps – slightly precariously in some cases – ready for the library’s ‘Bounce and Rhyme’ session.  The library assistant is perched in front of them, leading a group sing along to ‘Wind the Bobbin up’.  She has probably done this every week for months, but loves watching the look on the babies faces.  Recently they have been incorporating baby sign language with the bounce and rhyme which has proved to be very successful.

In the reference section a middle aged gentleman is seated at a computer.  He has headphones on and the fingers on his left hand trace over an embossed piece of paper.  The keyboard that his right hand is typing on has brightly coloured plastic keys and he hunts and pecks for the right letters.  It takes a little while, and he often pauses in between periods of typing.  Getting closer a faint voice is audible from the headphones.  It isn’t an audiobook that he is listening to with such concentration, but a screenreader which is enabling him to use the computer.  Under the desk his guide dog shifts position slightly.

A poster on the wall of the library advertises the Young Adult Reading Group which meets on the first Monday of the month.  This month’s book is a title about the different influences on a group of fourteen year old’s lives and how they deal with them – school, family, gangs, friends, drugs, bullies, church..  The author of the book has been invited to come to the library and discuss her book and the poster now bears a large red banner headline – FULL!  The library is planning to start a second YA group.  When the group meets, there will be an assortment of teenagers of all shapes and sizes eager to discuss their interpretation of the hero – or maybe the antihero – of the book, and his influence on the other characters, with the author, to see what she had in mind when she created him.

Another poster with a large image of a book, advertises a reading group with a different theme.  This reading group reads texts with a Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender theme and meets every fourth Friday of the month.  It is a very popular group and they have a list of titles on their reading list that they plan to read over the next year.  The library is introducing two more books groups from next month due to popular demand – a biography group (which has already had special requests not to read any that are ghost written or by people under thirty – which may limit the market) and a science fiction group.

Of course the library also has the standard book group – which is – as they oddly tend to be – female dominated, reading books that vary from Barbara Kingsolver to Lionel Shriver, Herman Melville to Haruki Murakami.  They sit in a circle, discussing their latest read, what they thought of it, who their favourite characters were, whether the ending was good, bad or indifferent, too abrupt or too drawn out.  Everyone has their own opinion and they aren’t afraid to voice them.  Every year the members of this library’s book group will read a title from the Orange Prize List.  They will discuss their title with other library book groups who have done the same and vote on who should win the Orange Prize.  Sadly their votes have no power over the Orange Prize judges but occasionally – very occasionally – they are right.

The faint murmur coming from the other end of the library shows that it is storytime.  The bounce and rhyme session has ended but the children have settled in to hear the story.  More children join them as it is the school holidays and there is nothing better to do.  It is dry in the library and raining outside, despite the fact that it is meant to be summer.

On the walls of the children’s library are clowns, trapeze artists, elephants, lions –  all types of characters advertising the Circus Stars summer reading challenge.  Children only need to read six or more books and get rewards and incentives if they do so.  Drawings by children and comments about the challenge cover the walls.

In the corner of the children’s library is an area designated ‘Homework’.  This is where the Homework Group meets one evening a week.  As it is the summer holidays, the area is deserted, the PC is unused and the books are neatly displayed on the shelves.  It won’t look like this nearer the end of the holiday when the children start panicking and want assistance to get that essay done for tomorrow…

A lone PC has a banner headline stating that it is only for the use of people looking for community information or the library catalogue.  An elderly woman wanders over to it and sits down, looking rather unsure.  The library assistant nearby walks over and asks if she needs help.  Five minutes later the woman leaves with a page of evening classes for internet use for beginners – helping silver surfers to get online.  A student sits down almost immediately and starts looking for a reference book for their coursework.

Back by the door of the library are more posters advertising community events, dances, homework groups, author visits, book groups…

This is your library

All human life is here.

Report of the Inquiry into Overcoming the Barriers to Literacy

The All-Party Parliamentary Group for Education has just published a “Report of the Inquiry into Overcoming the Barriers to Literacy.”

As literacy and libraries go hand in hand it is encouraging to see so much emphasis on the value of libraries within the report.

In defining the context of the inquiry it was indicated that “a poverty of trained librarians” was a factor contributing to low levels of literacy. At the same time you should also say that in the current climate, a lack of posts for trained librarians is also a factor. It’s no good having trained librarians if they are not employed in a role where their skills can be used.

Here are the main points made in the report regarding libraries.

“The right of citizens to visit a library and have access to a range of free reading material must be made overt and funding made available. Evidence shows that libraries both in schools and in the community have a positive effect on reading, yet many are disappearing because of financial constraints”

“The active encouragement of reading for pleasure should be a core part of every child’s curriculum entitlement because extensive reading and exposure to a wide range of texts make a huge contribution to students’ educational achievement. This is why libraries are so important to the development of a reading culture – both those in schools and those in the community.”

“Participants in the Inquiry praised the work of Sure Start Centres where parents and their children could come to improve parenting skills, address social issues and receive informal literacy help. The aims of these Sure Start programmes are to (1) increase the numbers of parents/carers reading with their children; (2) increase library membership amongst 0-4 year-olds and their parents/carers; (3) ensure that 100% of children have access to good quality play and learning; and (4) reduce the number of children who need specialist speech and language support by the time they start school.”

“Evaluations of Bookstart programmes in 2009 indicated that parents were strongly supportive of reading with babies and toddlers and generally read frequently with their children. Longitudinal evidence suggested marked improvement in book sharing frequency after receiving the packs for ‘less active’ reading families (those that reported having relatively few children’s books in the home and read with their child less than once a day). Three months after receiving a Bookstart pack these ‘less active’ reading families reported significantly increased reading frequency, stronger parental interest in reading with their child and higher levels of library membership. Early intervention initiatives such as Sure Start Centres and Bookstart should be guaranteed funding over a period of time.”

 

🙂 Celebrate your library (c) carlin33/Flickr

Theme 7 Specifically focused on protecting library provision…

“It was felt by all groups in this Inquiry that the lack of a coherent support for school libraries and their proven impact early in children’s education is a huge anomaly. Although it is clear that libraries are not the single answer to improving literacy, they are an important resource for supporting a school’s literacy teaching and learning.

The concern is that students without school libraries will not have access to a wide range of learning and reading resources to support their learning. A good library and, crucially, a good librarian, can be a real benefit to a school and attainment.

For example, the

School Library Commission Report, which surveyed 17,000 students, found that there was a very strong relationship between reading attainment and school library use. Young people who read below the expected level for their age were almost twice more likely to say that they are not a school library user. Conversely, those who read at or above the expected level were nearly three times more likely to say that they are school library users.”

“Many children have no books at home and such a culture will not encourage reading. Libraries are essential to provide free and open access to a wide variety of reading materials. Economic constraints are forcing some of these to close and for schools to limit their library facilities and this can only be a barrier to successful literacy for learners of all ages.”

“The Publishers Association reports that purchases of school library books have declined by 40% since 2002. The Secretary of State has said that children should be reading up to 50 books a year and that successful schools give a high profile to reading for pleasure, but current policy seems to operate against this.”

“Throughout the Inquiry, the School Library Association and several literacy associations highlighted the importance of books and reading materials of all kinds, including new technological developments.”

“Libraries must be central to literacy development, and must be appropriately resourced.”

So, the key observations can be summarised as:

  • Funding must be made available for free reading material and access to it via both school and public libraries.
  • Both school and public libraries are important because they provide a broad range of reading materials, which improves literacy and this in turn improves educational achievement.
  • Surestart and Bookstart schemes have a positive impact on library use.
  • School library services supported by a good librarian have a positive impact on literacy levels.
  • The current ethos of reducing funding for school and public libraries clearly goes against the idea of improving literacy.

We really hope this report, clearly highlighting the value of libraries and backed up by the opinions of experts in literacy and all Government parties, has a positive impact on securing the future of library provision in the UK.

Shush no more

 

Last week, I began a writing residency at Huddersfield Library, which ends this Saturday (9th July). But the title of ‘writer-in-residence’ is misleading; I’m not running writing workshops in schools or community centres. Instead, I’m listening to people’s stories about why they use the various library services, watching their routines and, in a sense, writing about what happens in a library. I confess that when I approached the library about doing a residency, I had very few expectations. I just wanted to sit there, listen to people and write about their lives, which is why I have approached the research as a personal project. Now, after only four days of moving between the various sections – lending, local history, knowledge transcription service, reference, sound and vision, childrens, art gallery – my head is spinning somewhat.

When Voices for the Library asked me to write a short piece about my research, I became paralysed with indecision. How can I possibly convey the value of the library as sharply as the librarians, bloggers and researchers who are encouraging the groundswell of public support against library closures? Do I write about how, on my first day, I waited outside the library steps at 9.20am for the doors to open, and watched a small crowd form, eager to get to the computers, get that job application sent, pay their bills online, or return that book. Or maybe I could write about how, last week when I sat in the reference library, 32 people entered in an hour to either locate someone using the professional directories and the internet, apply for jobs online, use the computers or fax, or the free scanner, ask for reference material, and read the newspapers and specialist magazines for free. Or maybe should write about what happens in the Light Reading Room and the success of the coffee mornings and the PALS (Practice Activity and Leisure Scheme) Art Group for stroke survivors.

‘Where else could you hold these sessions?’ I asked one of the organisers today.

‘We couldn’t,’ was his answer.

Maybe I could mention the children’s library, where pre-nursery sessions last week brought in new members, and where a registered child-minder with 16 years experience brings the children she cares for every single day. She plans their reading according to what is happening in their lives, such as having a new baby brother, or going to school for the first time.

‘I sell this place to everyone,’ she explains, ‘the parents see a difference in their children after they’ve been coming here a while.’

Then there’s the transcription service, and the team of four women who should be given medals for the work they do for the visually impaired. You name it, they Braille it, then record it as a podcast. Their volume of work is staggering. I should add my own example of how, as a researcher and writer with just an idea in my head and no money to support it, got a unanimous ‘you are welcome here,’ when I approached them. ‘We want you to succeed in your project,’ one staff member said, ‘we like to help writers.’

So, as a researcher, I already have a lot of rich data, and as a writer, I can make something of this data. Researchers often aim the findings of their work at policy makers, hoping to change policy. But who will listen to these voices? Will it be the mid-level policy adviser, fast-tracked through the civil service graduate scheme, who now finds himself in the midst of the library storm with his hands clapped firmly over his ears? I hope someone’s listening. I also hope there is a rich patron out there – I make no apologies for this shameless ‘wanted’ ad – who can help me extend this research throughout Yorkshire for a while longer.

In the meantime, some stories will appear on my blog this week, and the manuscript for a non-fiction book will be written over the coming months. If you would like me to visit your library, then please get in touch.

Nilam Ashra-McGrath is a writer and researcher for the non-profit sector. She is blogging about her residency at http://nilamsnet.wordpress.com/

 

Measuring the value of public libraries

VftL are delighted to present a blog post from newest team member Christine.

Methods for measuring the value of public libraries: a literature review

In today’s climate of accountability, a better understanding of the value of public libraries is becoming essential to preserving and encouraging public and private investment (Imholz and Arns, 2007, p.12).

In the UK competition for public funding has always been fierce and the newly elected coalition government have made it clear that cuts in public spending over the next few years are inevitable.    Public libraries will be re-evaluated alongside services provided by health, education, defence, transport, broadcasting, culture and the arts sectors.  There is an urgent need to adopt methods that enable the sector to appropriately communicate its value to a variety of audiences.

The research project…

Last year the Library and Information Research Group awarded me their first Scan Award to produce a comprehensive review of existing quantitative and qualitative evaluation methodologies for demonstrating the value of public libraries in the UK.   The findings of my research have been published as an article in their Journal.  This article presents an overview of current methods for measuring performance, discusses quantitative and qualitative methods to determine economic and social value, identifies examples of successful studies; and introduces methods from the non-profit sector which could prove useful in the future.  Although not exhaustive, the research is extensive and introduces a range of methodologies from the UK, USA, Australia and Canada.  It also identifies potential methodologies currently used in the non-profit, environmental and commercial sector.

Findings…

At the start of this review it became clear that a limited amount of public library valuation studies have been carried out in the UK in recent years.  Although several academic researchers had published journal articles and reports on the topic there has been little in the way of groundbreaking research since Bob Usherwood carried out his Social Impact Audits a decade ago.  While it is possible that some local authorities may be working in isolation to implement bespoke evaluation methodologies it has been difficult to uncover examples of best practice in the UK.  Therefore, it was necessary to expand the research into the broader areas of economics, sociology and psychology.  This enabled a more thorough understanding of the increase in evaluations, incentives, benchmarking, objective setting, accountability; and social and economic auditing.

Overall, the research has revealed that quantitative evaluations produce valuable statistical data and can effectively estimate the financial outputs of public libraries, thus enabling a greater understanding of economic value.  Yet their scope is limited as they fail to recognise service outcomes such as the impact that the public library has on the lives of individuals and communities.  Therefore, in order to gain a greater understanding of the social value of public libraries we must consider adopting qualitative evaluation methodologies.  However, it is unrealistic to expect to be able to measure social value with as much confidence as we do economic value because as a methodology it is still underdeveloped.  As Tuan (2008, p.7) points out, methods for evaluating economic value have been around for centuries, whereas methods for measuring social value have only been around for three or so decades.  Also, as there is no official ‘social auditing body’ that promotes uniformity in social value creation methodologies and no defined infrastructure for assessing social value, “measuring and/or estimating social value will continue to be practiced more like an isolated art form than widespread science(Tuan, 2008, p.7).  This is of relevance to the public library sector where our ability to produce social value is considered by some to be one of our greatest commodities.   Perhaps the greatest challenge with regards measuring the value of public libraries is that:

There is no litmus test for value because defining value in the context of libraries is complex, individual stakeholders are unique, performance measurement is essentially spatial, and operating in an environment that is neither causal nor predictive creates complications (Cram, 1999, p. 1).

 

Ideas for the future…
Although this review has revealed that there is no perfect methodology for measuring the value of public libraries, there are many possibilities.  Methodologies exist to evaluate the full range of services that public libraries deliver and we are seeing a number of emerging methodologies for assessing the impact of digital services and access to ICT.  The challenge for those tasked with evaluating outputs and outcomes, therefore, is to find the methodology that best fits their project and the objectives of their research.  Therefore, it is recommended that the public library sector work together to create a comprehensive methodology which encourages use of common measures, language and practices for collecting and analysing data.  Implementation of a standard methodology could enable the sector to communicate the true value of public libraries to the UK economy and society as a whole.

Access to Christine’s full article is available here.

References

Bryson, J., Usherwood, B. and Streatfield, D. (2002).  Social Impact Audit for the South West Museums Libraries and Archives Council.  Centre for the Public Library in the Information Society.  Department of Information Studies, The University of Sheffield. [SWMLAC Report].

Cram, J. (1999).  Six impossible things before breakfast”: a multidimensional approach to measuring the value of libraries. In: Proceedings of the 3rd Northumbria International Conference on Performance Measurement in Libraries and Information Services 1999, Newcastle upon Tyne 2000.

Imholz, S., & Arns, J. W. (2007). Worth Their Weight: An assessment of the evolving field of library valuation. Americans for Libraries Council. http://www.ala.org/research/sites/ala.org.research/files/content/librarystats/worththeirweight.pdf

Linley, R and Usherwood, B. (1998).  New Measures for the New Library: A Social Audit of Public Libraries.  Centre for the Public Library in the Information Society.  Department of Information Studies, The University of Sheffield.  [British Library Research and Innovation Centre Report 89].  http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/is/research/centres/cplis/research/index.html/.
Tuan, Melinda T. Measuring and/or Estimating Social Value Creation: Insights into Eight Integrated Cost Approaches, Final Paper 12.15.08. Publication. Seattle: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, 2008. http://www.gatesfoundation.org/learning/Documents/WWL-report-measuring-estimating-social-value-creation.pdf/.

 

Christine’s full article is available here http://www.lirg.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/article/view/469/494.

 

Bio

Christine Rooney-Browne is an Arts and Humanities funded PhD student based at the University of Strathclyde in Scotland.  She passionately believes in the potential of public libraries to educate, challenge and inspire and is currently investigating the social value of public libraries. Her research interests encompass public library evaluation, social auditing, and the nature of public library services in the twenty-first century.  Christine also has extensive experience in marketing, having worked both in the public and private sector.

 

 

Somewhere special – K M Lockwood

Somewhere special

In the morning

A young couple come in hesitantly. The proud new dad still finds the buggy awkward to manoeuvre and mum is oh-so-tired. Joe and Kulvinder want to do the best by their precious baby but they have little spare cash, what with taking time off work and childcare to think about.

They know encouraging a baby to love language is like breast feeding – one of the best starts in life. But who can they ask? Which books are suitable? Where can they find a fun introduction to learning?

In the afternoon

Elaine comes in as beautifully made up as she did when Roger was alive. She comes in to learn how to use a pc. Always a bright cookie, she would like to save money by paying her bills on-line. She comes in to get the large print books which let her escape to other worlds. She comes in to be with other people. It’s her little trip out.

Just after school

Ade runs in with his homework in his bag. He finds a spot and settles down to work. He is keen to learn but there is no space in his Mum’s tiny flat. He finds something he doesn’t understand. He gets up and asks a librarian and she helps him find reference books and useful websites.  He grasps the new concept. Tomorrow he will shine in class.

In the school holidays

Courtney sidles in and finds a quiet corner between the little children’s books and the Young Adult fiction. No one notices her there; she can read what she likes. She sits with her scuffed shoes that don’t fit tucked under her.

She has found somewhere safe from the girls who make fun of her thin, cheap clothes. She has found somewhere safe till Dad comes back from work. She has found somewhere safe to dream of better times.

They have all come to the right place: they have all come to the library.

K. M. Lockwood is a writer for children and young adults who lives by the sea in West Sussex.  Website is http://kmlockwood.com/

Costing public library use

I have previously blogged about the value of public libraries to me and my family. A few months ago we set up a new blog listing the books we borrow including their cost, Overdue Books. One of the reasons behind setting up this blog was to show the true cost of the books we borrow. A common argument against the need for public libraries is that books are cheap, why borrow when you can just buy. While some books are relatively cheap and while there is lots of material free online to read this doesn’t mean its the type of material I want to read or introduce my young children too. I am also in the fortunate postion to be able to afford to buy some books and have online access, however this is not the case for everyone.
Overdue Books is keeping a count of all the books we borrow from the library including costs where possible, a blog post ‘counting the cost’ has technical details on how this has been done. In under 2 years if we had bought all the books we borrowed from the library we would have spent an estimated £3400, this works out roughly as a book habit of £150 a month, definitely not something we could afford.
Our young son is the biggest user of the library in terms of number of books he borrow. I think having such a wealth and variety of books is a huge benefit in terms of his development, use of imagination, his language skills etc. Not something you can add a value to.
He is able to choose from, what I recognise, as a good and appropiate collection of material far superior to what you would find in many bookshops. While online bookstores have a much wider range of stock he is too young to successfully browse and select items also there would be the cost of purchase, which as I previoulsy mentioned would be too prohibitive .
I have been interested to see my son’s use of the library and acknowledge that it is much more than just borrowing books. He has learned a sense of community and sharing, knowing he needs to return the books so other people can have a chance to borrow them as well. The freedom to borrow any material without any consequences such as cost, means he can be adventurous in his reading, if he doesn’t like it he can just return it. The library also provides a safe environment where he meets other children and parents as well as the opportunity to take part in some of the activities run by the library.
The borough where we live, Warwickshire is currently running a 12 week consultation  from March 18  until June 9 as the council is planning budget cuts of approx 27% over the next 3 years to the library and information service. These cuts include the closure of a number of libraries. From completing the consultation document I was left a little unclear as to what impact the consultation will have considering it seems like the decision to close the libraries has already been made. The tone of the document made me think the purpose of the consultation was mainly to see if anyone else wanted to take over the running of these libraries. Personally I have concerns about community run libraries in terms of their sustainabilty to in maintaing standards.
It is really disheartening to see that many local authorities across the UK are looking to close libraries as part of their cost cutting measures. We recently had a new addition to the family and is already a member of our public library, I do hope for the sake of future generations we do not lose something as valuable as our public libraries as without them it would be a poorer society.

 

 

Library card

Damyanti Patel

Valuing Public Libraries

Birmingham Public Library

I attended a debate last year run jointly by the Birmingham Salon and CILIP West Midlands about‘What Libraries are for’. It was an interesting evening and I really enjoyed hearing peoples views on libraries, whether they should be a quiet sanctuary, hired space for communities, running vegetable contests, space to inspire learning etc.

It also got me thinking about what public libraries mean to me and in particular it’s the aspect of social inclusion that really appeals.

During the debate there were numerous mentions of ebooks and ebook readers & their impact on the library. Personally I am not sure how much of a driver this is to re-invent the library, while these are available they are still not accessible to everyone unlike a public library. I do use my phone for reading but that hasn’t replaced all my print books and I don’t imagine it will do for some time. Someone raised the point of ‘are libraries just a warehouse of books or a space to inspire learning’. As the book industry evolves and new technologies arise I think it offers libraries more opportunities to evolve services and continue to provide access to information.

Another  key point that was raised during the debate was the about the library being a service not a building. This made me wonder whether success is still being measured through footfall of the physical space as libraries continue widen access further and deliver services out to communities as well as providing the information to your desktop.

From a personal point of view I have always been a keen user of public libraries, they have & continue to provide me with information, resources, the space etc. As a child libraries gave me the opportunity to indulge in my love of reading which in turn led me to aspire to learn more, become educated, go to university, find a profession. Libraries helped me level the playing field providing me with the same opportunities as others.

Looking back I have been regularly using public libraries at least once a month over the last 20 years and really appreciate the chance to discover new authors, new recipes to try, indulge in my aspiration to be creative through numerous self help and guide books.  I have enjoyed seeing collections evolve, introduction of multi-media, e-resources, PCs, integration of local services etc. In many cases some have been more successful than others but I have always appreciated the efforts to keep the marvellous public service alive in times of clear under investment and resource.

I now have a little boy who we’ve taken to the library since he was a week old. While we are fortunate to be able to provide him with a collection of books at home, we could never match what is available in the library. Its great to see his evolving use of the library, from crawling to the box to throw books out to beginning to look through and choose himself and now even tentatively foray into the non-fiction. He loves having the choice to try things out, see if its interests him find out about what he likes and dislikes.

A key word that continues to keep coming back to me with public libraries is the opportunities they provide to help people fill their potential.

Damyanti Patel

Tigers, Poets, and Superheroes

The importance of public libraries to their communities is reflected in the range and variety of events and activities that take place in and around them. With this in mind, here are another few highlights of the activities taking place in libraries around the UK:

Kirklees Libraries’ homebound borrowers were treated to a day out at Huddersfield town hall in a co-operatively organised event. A range of activities and entertainment was laid on, such as storytelling, an exercise session, the Borough Organist, and useful information on the Digital Switch-Over/benefits/pensions was provided too.

One of the Kirklees Libraries’ staff members, Jo Haslam, has recently been awarded joint second prize (out of 12,000 entries!) in the National Poetry Society Competition for her piece ‘Wish’. She will be appearing at the Ledbury Poetry Festival in July. Jo works as a Bibliotherapist and Customer Service Officer at Slaithwaite Library.

Chris Manby visited Gowerton Library on Thursday 14th of April. She spoke to an enthralled audience about her newest romantic comedy ‘Kate’s Wedding’ and the trials and tribulations of being a writer. Swansea Libraries also have a busy schedule of fun free childrens events and activities during the Easter holidays – just like your local library! Theirs will include, amongst others: a Superhero party, a visit from Zoolab’s creepy-crawlies, and screenings of several family films.

Pictures of the new library facility for Southend town centre have been released – the new joint venture between Southend Council, Essex University and South Essex College will provide a fantastic asset to the people of the town. As well as housing the library, it will also house the Focal Point Gallery, a lecture theatre, meeting/teaching rooms, a higher education centre, and a cafe. There will also be a public square outside the building.

Edinburgh Libraries have started a new initiative called ‘Tiger Tales‘ aimed at parents with children aged 4-8. This will give them the opportunity to sit down together and enjoy a story told by the Tiger Tale Tellers, and to socialise with other parents and children in a safe environment. To add some extra excitement, the first session was held within Edinburgh Zoo and also featured a jungle quiz, face-painting and other activities.

That’s just a small number of the things going on in libraries. If you want to find out what’s going on in your local public library why not visit your local library website and look for the “What’s on?” or “Events” link on it for more details.

…and, if you’ve enjoyed an event at your local library, why not share your experiences with us, by emailing us with details at stories@voicesforthelibrary.org.uk

Fantastic Bounce & Rhyme

We were sent this comment about a local “Bounce & Rhyme” session, via a member of library staff. “Bounce & Rhyme” sessions are ½ hour long sessions during which they sing and recite a variety of bouncing, jiggling and finger rhymes and lullabies. Staff take it in turns to lead the sessions. Jon, their “male voice”, is especially popular with their parents & carers; they always seem to join in the singing more enthusiastically when he leads.

Fantastic bounce & rhyme. Mothers with babies haven’t got the time, usually, to write in these books so I’m sure you’ve got less feedback than you deserve. Great session. Lovely for the babies to hear a male voice when the groups are so often female dominated. I’m sure it encourages fathers to come too. A friend who has never been to bounce & rhyme before said she was “moved to tears” by watching the babies response. Fantastic opportunity – so inclusive in a world where everything is usually so expensive. Thank you!

BB on Bryher photo

Arty Librarian

Bunnies, WORDfest and human libraries

Public libraries are as much about the community that use them, as they are about book lending. This community spirit is often highlighted by events, activities and classes run in libraries. There are so many of these fun events happening throughout the country that we thought we would spread the word about them.

So, below are a few of the great events happening in libraries throughout the UK.

Crawley is currently running its own WORDfest (2nd – 9th April). It’s Crawley’s first ever festival dedicated to celebrating words and writing in its many forms. Highlights include a talk by Wilbur Smith, fun days, live short-story writing, book fair, open mic session and a talk on self publishing.

The Scarborough Literature Festival is running from 14th – 17th April and is now in its 5th year. Authors involved in the festival include Sarah Waters, Joanna Trollope, Jodi Picoult. Other events include sessions with Steve Bell (Guardian cartoonist), children’s book illustrator Tony Ross, youth workshops and fringe events in libraries outside Scarborough. Elsewhere in North Yorkshire, Malton Library, is running an Easter promotion for children, including an Easter bunny animal welfare session… and free chocolate.

Robin Reads from Kingsley Amis

ggstopflat/Flickr

Bedfont Library, in Hounslow, recently held a craft fair with stalls run by each of the groups that use the library for weekly classes. Watercolour paintings, knitted items and sewing crafts were amongst the items on sale.

In partnership with NHS Bolton, Bolton Library took part in World Autism Awareness Day by running a human library event with volunteers who are affected by the condition. The event allowed library users to talk to the volunteers about autism and gain a personal insight into how it affects people.

The community of Selston in Nottinghamshire involved youngsters in a project, which was funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund, to create stained glass windows for the library and college.

That’s just a handful of the fun activities that have happened or are happening in libraries in the near future. We’ll be letting you know about more of these events in future, but if you want to find out what’s going on in your local public library why not visit your local library website and look for the “What’s on?” or “Events” link on it for more details.

…and, if you’ve enjoyed an event at your local library, why not share your experiences with us, by emailing us with details at stories@voicesforthelibrary.org.uk